The "NEAT" Weight Loss and
Fitness Program

Want a weight loss and fitness program that doesn't require you do any exercise? Dr. James Levine, a top obesity expert in the U.S., says we suffer from "sitting disease". We sit too much. We are sedentary. And this is killing us. Some claim that sitting is the new smoking.

If only we could get up more often. Well, Dr. Levine is trying to change that. In his book "Move a Little, Lose a Lot" he describes how small activities throughout the day burn calories. Non-exercise activity thermogenesis. Or NEAT for short. Activities that aren't classified as exercise but still burn calories.

Any movement of the body burns calories. Even just wiggling your little finger burns some calories. (Well, fractions of a calorie.) He remarks how people who fidget a lot can also commonly be lean people. All those little movements pay off.

In the book he talks about how being sedentary is causing people to gain weight. How our system of living entices us to sit more, drive more, eat more and move less. Our older system let us move more frequently.

Even just chopping vegetables more of the time instead of putting them in a food processor can have an effect. When combined with similar daily chores that have been removed from our routines, these small movements can add up to many calories being burned throughout the day.

Click here to look at "Move a Little, Lose a Lot" by Dr. James Levine on Amazon.

What the NEAT Weight Loss and Fitness Program Wants You to Do

The weight loss and fitness program he suggests in the book consists of:

1) more walking, preferably three 45-minute walks a day or a similar combination, and

2) more smaller, "NEAT" movements - actions that make you move, but wouldn't be classified as exercise.

For example, something you can do that isn't an exercise but burns more calories is standing instead of sitting. By standing more throughout the day you will burn more calories. Not much more it may seem, but over the course of a year, people can lose 10 pounds or so.

It's not exercise, but it adds up. Try taking small "standing breaks" when you're watching TV or on the phone. Get up from the couch more often. Over the course of a year, it will all have an effect.

Convert your computer desk at work into a standing desk. You can buy actual standing desks, but they can be a bit pricey. I converted my desk at work with just some concrete bricks for about ten or twenty dollars. If you do this, you might want to get a pad of some sort to stand on to give you extra cushioning. You can buy these in stores or you could make your own, for example, with a piece of carpet.

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